URINARY
INCONTINENCE

35% of people over the age of 60 have been found to have some form of urinary incontinence. Urinary incontinence is defined as “any leakage of urine”.  It is a common problem which can impact a patient’s quality of life.  It is more common in women than men. Among other things, risk factors can include pregnancy, childbirth and menopause.

CAUSES

Urinary Incontinence isn’t a disease, it’s a symptom. It can be caused by everyday habits, underlying medical conditions or physical problems. A thorough evaluation by your doctor can help determine what’s behind your incontinence.

SYMPTOMS

The two most common types of incontinence are stress and urgency incontinence. Urge incontinence is caused by an over active bladder and stress incontinence is due to poor closure of the bladder. Stress incontinence often occurs with coughing or sneezing.  Patients with both problems have mixed urinary incontinence.  Enuresis often used to classify urinary incontinence in children.

Types:

STRESS
INCONTINENCE

Urine leaks when you exert pressure on your bladder by coughing, sneezing, laughing, exercising or lifting something heavy. 

URGE
INCONTINENCE

You have a sudden, intense urge to urinate followed by an involuntary loss of urine. You may need to urinate often, including throughout the night. Urge incontinence may be caused by a minor condition, such as infection, or a more-severe condition such as a neurologic disorder or diabetes.

FUNCTIONAL INCONTINENCE

A physical or mental impairment keeps you from making it to the toilet in time. For example, if you have severe arthritis, you may not be able to unbutton your pants quickly enough. 

OVERFLOW INCONTINENCE

You experience frequent or constant dribbling of urine due to a bladder that doesn’t empty completely.

MIXED
INCONTINENCE

You experience more than one type of urinary incontinence. 

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

DIAGNOSIS:

Diagnosis is confirmed through urinalysis, physical exam and occasionally urodynamics and cystoscopy.

TREATMENT:

Treatment includes oral medications, pelvic floor muscle training, bladder training and electrical stimulation.  Conservative treatment include behavior modification and avoiding bladder irritants.